Tag: decision making

Making The Tough Call

Every leader faces tough times and that’s when leaders distinguish tough callthemselves and show who they really are. Leading others can be very difficult and can take great courage. Of course, it’s not that way all of the time. About 95 percent of the decisions a CEO makes could be made by a reasonably intelligent high school graduate. What is often required is common sense. But CEOs don’t get paid for those decisions; they get paid for the other 5 percent! Those are the tough calls. Every change, every challenge, and every crisis requires a tough call, and the way those are handled is what separates good leaders from the rest.

How do you know when you’re facing a tough call and need to be at your best as a leader? You’ll know when the decision is marked by these three things: Continue reading “Making The Tough Call”

Making The Tough Call
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Defining Your Moments As Leader

Leaders become better leaders when they experience a defining moment and respond to it correctly. Anytime they experience a breakthrough, it allows the people who follow them to also benefit. The difficulty with defining moments is that you don’t get to choose them. You can’t sit down with your calendar and say, “I’m going to schedule a defining moment for next Tuesday at eight o’clock.” You cannot control when they will come. However, you can choose how you will handle them when they come, and you can take steps to prepare for them. Here’s how:

Reflect on Defining Moments from the Past

It’s said that those who do not study history are destined to repeat its pastmistakes. That statement applies not only in a broad sense to a nation or culture but also to individuals and their personal histories. The best teacher for a leader is evaluated experience. To predict how you will han­dle defining moments in the future, look at the ones from your past. Continue reading “Defining Your Moments As Leader”

Defining Your Moments As Leader
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Finding The Main Thing

In order for you to finding the main thing when come to the decision making, here are few questions that you need to consider.

What gives me the greatest return? What is most rewarding? What is required of me? Those were not questions you could always readily answer. Early in a career, the easiest to answer is usually the one concerning requirements. You can work from a job description if you have one. On the other hand, most people don’t start getting a true sense of what give the greatest return for their effort until they reach their thirties—sometimes even later in life. And what is most rewarding to a person often changes during different seasons of life.

As you worked, reflected, and grew, you will slowly begin discovering the answers to those three key questions. This guiding principle was that the purpose of all work is results. If you wanted to accomplish objectives and be productive, you needed to provide forethought, structure, systems, planning, intelligence and honestly. But you need also know that you needed to keep things simple. If you had read a study of thirty-nine midsized companies stating the characteristic that differentiated the successful companies the unsuccessful was simplicity. The companies that are sold fewer products fewer customers, and who worked with fewer suppliers than other companies in the same industry were more profitable. Simple, focused operations brought greater results. As Warren Buffett observes, “The business schools reward difficult, complex behavior more than simple behavior, but simple behavior is more effective.” By striving for simplicity, I could help myself to keep my mind on the main thing.
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Finding The Main Thing
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A Leader’s First Responsibility Is to Define Reality

Leader’s responsibility can be define real­ity was from leadership expert and author Max DePree. His assertion made sense to me instantly. And Humorist Garrison Keillor, who said, “Sometimes you have to look reality in the eye and deny it.”

You Can’t Define What You Don’t See

In the reality world, people change only when they hurt enough that they haveleader responsibility to, learn enough that they want to, or receive enough that they are able to. For example in my case, pain prompted me to learn. In 2005, I came to face-to-face with a painful reality: one of my companies was steadily losing money and its efforts seemed to be going in too many directions. This problem did not appear suddenly. For five years there had been indicators that I should make changes, but I was unwilling to make them. I needed to change my leadership team, but I didn’t want to do it. I loved my inner circle. And year after year, I was willing to absorb the small losses that the company experienced. But after five years, the losses began to add up and take their toll. Continue reading “A Leader’s First Responsibility Is to Define Reality”

A Leader’s First Responsibility Is to Define Reality
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